Every death must be registered.

Here are contact details for local Register Offices and all the details you will need when you go to register a death

Please ensure you call to make an appointment with the Registrar.

 

If someone dies in a hospital, care home or hospice:

A member of the nursing staff will contact a doctor to attend and certify death to enable a Certificate Of Death to be issued. Once the doctor has attended we can then move the deceased to our Chapel of Rest. The nursing or care staff will inform the family when and where the Certificate Of Death may be collected.

Three important points

  • Every death must be registered but it is not imperative to do it before making funeral arrangements.
  • The death must normally be registered within five days.
  • The death must be registered by the Registrar of Births, Deaths and Marriages for the area in which the death occurred. You can, however, supply the relevant details at any Registry Office in England or Wales and these will be forwarded to the appropriate area. This may delay obtaining death certificates

Those who may register are:

  • A relative of the deceased.
  • A person present at death.
  • A person arranging the funeral (this does not mean the Funeral Director).
  • In certain circumstances others, such as the Administrators of Residential Care Homes may register the death.

The information about the deceased required by the Registrar is:

  • The person’s full name at the time of death
  • Any previously used names, e.g., maiden name
  • Date of death
  • Date and place of birth
  • Occupation or occupation prior to retirement
  • Their last address
  • The full name, date of birth and occupation of a surviving or late spouse or civil partner.
  • NHS number (take Medical Card if available)
  • If the deceased was in receipt of a pension or allowance from public funds, then details will be required.

When the death has been registered you will receive the following certificates:

  • A green form known as the “Certificate For Burial Or Cremation”. You should give this to the Funeral Director.
  • In cases where the Coroner is involved and cremation is intended or an inquest is to be held, this certificate will not be issued. Instead a “Certificate For Cremation” will be issued by the Coroner, and will usually be passed directly to the Funeral Director.
  • A white Social Security certificate will be given on all occasions and should be sent to your local DSS office along with any relevant pension books.
  • A buff coloured copy of the entry of death form (known as a “Copy Death Certificate”). These may be obtained from the registrar upon payment of a nominal fee and are required as proof of the death for insurance purposes, probate, bank accounts etc. Additional copies of this certificate can always be obtained at a later date.